Pour It Up, Pour It Up At Rosé Mansion

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Writer Christina Claus swings on the chandelier after a fun-filled trip through the mansion. (Photo by Resala Samadi)

Disclaimer: You will get confetti everywhere.

But that’s what makes it fun because there aren’t many places you’d find dispensers full of different types of confetti you can pour into your palms and later throw into the air while you stand inside of a giant pastel pink and blue cake. Plus, sips of rosé are just steps away. How could it get any better?

Honestly, after a long day of work, the Rosé Mansion is the perfect spot to just let loose, throw that confetti, relive your childhood in the ball pit, drink that rosé and snap some Instagram-worthy shots.

The bubble ball pit is perfect for Instagram Boomerang videos. (Photos by James Coletta)

The Experience

The Rosé Mansion is quite literally a wine flight. As soon as you walk out of the elevator that takes you down into the pink-clad 32,000-square-foot experience, you’re transported to an airport waiting area, complete with a few picture-worthy walls. After a brief safety video, guests are escorted into the mansion. To enter the mansion, you walk through a multiple-arched walkway into what appears to be a field of giant wine grape balls, perfect for tossing for a cute picture or for running through.

After grabbing your plastic Rosé Mansion-branded wine glass, you get to enjoy the first stop of your wine flight—a taste of wine and a little history. Soon, you’re walking through a laboratory with flasks full of pink fluff and a mock fermentation set-up, only to be led to a room filled with little alcoves, each carrying a different light. At first, I thought it was just going to be a cute photo, but then I realized it was a game of scratch and sniff. Each alcove was adorned with a scratch-and-sniff sticker and a covered plaque you could unveil with the answer to what you were sniffing once you were done guessing. But the room was more than just a throwback to my childhood of scratch and sniff books, it taught mansion-goers about aromas—wine jargon used to describe how a wine smells.

Transitioning to the next room, one is transported to Egypt, during the time when Cleopatra ruled as pharaoh, to test out the wine that Mark Antony and Julius Caesar would send her.

As I traveled throughout the mansion, I was able to view an island oasis, play a game to find out what kind of wine fit my taste buds—sweet, so it guessed perfectly—and try on some different hats and fancy robes for photo ops in front of a makeup mirror.

My top three favorite rooms had to have been the garden, the birthday cake room and the ball pit of bubbles. As soon as I entered the garden, a room covered from floor to ceiling in greenery, rose petals and empty bathtubs, I wanted to frolic through the scattered rose petals others were picking up to throw in the air for an Instagram Boomerang. Of course, the birthday cake room was an actual treat, calling for a celebration as I watched others jump from the cake and throw confetti. The ball pit was a bit surprising. I didn’t realize how strenuous it would be to trudge through the bubble balls to get a cute Boomerang of myself falling back into the pit or throwing the bubbles in the air.

After the tour, I was let out into a rosé wonderland, a brightly colored room where mansion-goers could purchase more than 120 types of wine—including the eight rosés featured throughout—food, swings, picnic tables and cabanas. The entire experience from beginning to end, while it’s more of a rosé tasting experience, allowed for a freeing afternoon, where I could let loose, make a few funny faces, strike new poses for some great photos with friends and just laugh.

Morgan First and Tyler Balliet

The Backstory

Yeah, it’s a really cool experience and similar to other Instagrammable museums like the Color Factory or the Museum of Ice Cream, so did the owners just jump on the bandwagon?

No, they’ve been wine connoisseurs for quite some time and wanted to bring their knowledge to the public in a fun and interactive way, so this format just seemed like the perfect fit.

Cofounder Tyler Balliet explained he was in his mid-20s, living in Boston, trying to figure out what to do as a day job when he started writing about wine. Soon, he was being paid to fly around the world, meet winemakers, hear their stories and, of course, taste the wine.

From there, Balliet grew his wine connections, so he and current cofounder Morgan First began running educational wine tasting events throughout the country. While this business was fun to be in with the travel and tastings, Balliet and First sold it to move on to their next endeavor—the Rosé Mansion.

“We talked about a museum of science for wine,” said Balliet. “We saw the museum model with building out the whole space. It’s not a new idea. We ultimately chose rosé because it’s a really great vehicle for storytelling. Morgan and I do all creatives. The concept starts with us and we sit around and come up with crazy ideas.”

He explained the two wanted mansion-goers to have the educational and historical aspect of the pink wine, while getting an interactive experience, plus a cool photo. While the cofounders kept some of the rooms from last year, they updated a few, like the ball pit, and added new ones like the Cleopatra room, which is one of Balliet’s favorites.

“Ultimately, the goal is to put smiles on faces,” said Balliet of the mansion. “It’s tough to live in New York and even if you’re visiting, you want to have fun and act like a kid and celebrate. It’s a good place to take a friend who is having a tough day to get them to laugh for an hour.”

The entire tour takes about 60 to 90 minutes. General admission tickets are $45 and include eight tasting samples, a GoVino wine glass, a collectible enamel pin and more. For more information or tickets, visit www.rosewinemansion.com.

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