The Homeless Bee Project In Kisii, Kenya

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Two Kenyans building the hives

Returned Peace Corps Volunteers of LI and the Ethical Humanist Society of LI are raising funds for a beekeeping project in Kenya.

Environmental degradation has challenged a stone-carving community in Tabaka, Kenya, to find new sources of income. The stone, which has supported a thriving economy for several generations, has been affected by climate change and suddenly the new carvings are fragile and worth far less than previously.

Elkana Omweri Ong’esa, the world-famous carver from the village, is behind a project aimed at the village’s women, elderly and unemployed youth called the Homeless Bee Project. Honey is a prized commodity in Africa and Ong’esa’s project is geared to provide a livelihood for hundreds of people.

Arthur and Lyn Dobrin, of Westbury, have known Elkana since 1965, when they were Peace Corps Volunteers in the area and he was a high school student. Elkana is a community leader, championing various community development causes.

“We are committed to helping raise the funds for the project to buy the necessary equipment,” said Linda Merola, RPCV-LI’s coordinator who served in the Philippines, 

The Ethical Humanist Society is offering a matching grant of $10,000. To make a contribution, send a check made out to Kenya Bee Project to EHS of LI, 38 Old Country Road, Garden City, NY 11530.

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