Healthy Habits For American Heart Month

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HeartMonth
Despite decades of medical research and public campaigns to ease the problem, heart disease is the No. 1 killer in the United States and throughout the Western world. One of the problems driving heart disease is the messaging, said Robert Thompson, MD, an integrative medicine specialist deemed by his peers to be in the top 5 percent of U.S. physicians. While there’s plenty of research to indicate good advice, the general public and many of his peers in the medical community are stuck with faulty conclusions Thompson said.
“Perhaps the biggest misconception is that an overabundance of calcium, which may include supplements, is very good for people, especially women. But that’s simply not true,” he said.

Thompson noted that calcium is just one of 12 substances, as well as traces of 64 other minerals, that make up our bones. Excessive amounts of calcium hurt our bodies in many ways, especially the heart and the brain, he added. “We cannot possibly replace minerals with just calcium, which hardens concrete and makes bones more brittle.”
Thompson offered the following recommendations for what individuals can start doing for better overall health in recognition of American Heart Month this month.

Drinking plenty of water is a good habit to get into as a means of maintaining healthy habits for your heart.
Drinking plenty of water is a good habit to get into as a means of maintaining healthy habits for your heart.

• Drink at least 64 ounces of water a day. As a general rule, we need to drink half of our bodyweight in ounces of water daily. For a 150-pound individual, that’s 75 ounces of water. Those who are overweight or are heavy exercisers or live in warm climates may need more. Take care to drink quality water. Get a quality filtration system at home, which can range from $200 to $3,000.
• Take ionic sea salt-derived minerals. Adults all need a diverse range of minerals. Ionic minerals are the only ones that are completely available for bodies to use because they are water-soluble and they naturally carry an electrical charge that allows them to be carried through the cell membranes. At least three grams per day of all sea salt-derived trace mineral products are recommended.
• Use only vitamin supplements made from 100 percent organic whole foods that have been vine-ripened. Adults need supplements because contemporary food supplies lack adequate amounts of vitamins and minerals, thanks to soil depletion. Most store-bought vitamins include just one component of the many complex molecular elements contained in the naturally occurring vitamin source.
• Get your fill of essential fatty acids. Raw nuts and seeds are a good source. In 2003, the Food and Drug Administration approved the following health claim for seven kinds of nuts: “Scientific evidence suggests, but does not prove that eating 1.5 ounces per day of most raw nuts as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease.” Omega-3 and omega-6 are considered essential because humans can’t manufacture them within our bodies.
• Eat high-quality proteins. Seafood, eggs, beans, chicken, game meat, duck and turkey are excellent sources of essential amino acids that are the building blocks of every protein molecule, hormone, neurotransmitter, cell membranes and immune molecules. Proteins can also be obtained from grains, sprouted grains, raw nuts and raw seeds. Vegetarians and vegans need to play close attention to combine protein sources to get the full complement of amino acids.
• Walk at least 30 minutes every day. This activity has an impact on relieving the physiologic effects of stress on the human physiology. Exercise is good, but walking is amazing. No other single activity will more significantly or more rapidly affect the adrenal stress response in humans than walking, which probably works so well because it slows us down. And it is an incredible way to build relationships.
“Also, I recommend ingesting essential monosaccharides, which is new and unknown territory for most people,” Thompson said. “They are the simplest form of carbohydrate molecules found in the body, are essential for protein molecules and can be found in maple syrup, sweet potatoes, parsnips, beets and onions.”

—Submitted by News and Experts

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