Exhibits To Check Out Spring Break

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Mo Willems (Photo by Marty Umans, taken from New-York Historical Society Museum & Library website)
Mo Willems (Photo by Marty Umans, taken from New-York Historical Society Museum & Library website)

With spring break heading our way, giving us some freedom from our everyday routine of school and/or work, it’s a convenient time to do activities and go on adventures with family and friends. Here are a few interesting and new museum exhibits this month that you can visit and explore on both the Island and in the city during the break.


Andy Warhol (1928–1987), In the Bottom of My Garden, ca. 1956. The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, Contribution the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. © 2016 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.
Andy Warhol (1928–1987), In the Bottom of My Garden, ca. 1956. The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, Contribution the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. © 2016 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

1) Warhol By the Book

Feb. 5 through May 15, 2016

The Morgan Library and Museum
225 Madison Ave. at 36th Street, NY
212-685-0008

Are you an Andy Warhol fan? Then you’re in luck. This is the first exhibit in New York showcasing Warhol’s book illustrations. Warhol did a plethora of art for books throughout his career. He provided his artwork for more than 80 projects for books, many of which he left behind. This exhibit displays 130 pieces of art spanning from Warhol’s days as a student to his early years as a marketed artist in New York continuing throughout his career. According to the museum’s website, this showcase includes the only surviving project for a book from the ’40s; archival material, rare books, text-based books, photography books, children’s books, self-published books, photographs, screen prints, drawings; and his “much-sought-after dust jacket” projects.

ArtWhimsyMoWillems2) The Art and Whimsy of Mo Willems

March 18 through Sept. 25, 2016

New-York Historical Society Museum & Library
170 Central Park West, NY
212-873-3400

If you have kids, or even if you were a Sesame Street fan as a kid and are feeling nostalgic, then this fun-filled exhibit is for you. Organized by the Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, this exhibit will feature the works of animator, writer and children’s author Mo Willems. This New York Times best-selling writer, known for writing the 2003 children’s book Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus!, won countless awards such as two Geisel Medals, five Geisel Honors, three Caldecott Honors, and he is in the Picture Book Hall of Fame. His writing for the timeless, popular TV show PBS’ Sesame Street and other shows such as Cartoon Network’s Sheep in the Big City and Codename: Kids Next Door, in which he was the head writer, has landed him six Emmy awards. He also wrote two musicals—Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Musical and Elephant & Piggie’s We Are In a Play!

Image: Alice Neel. James Hunter Black Draftee, 1965. Oil on canvas. COMMA Foundation, Belgium, © The Estate of Alice Neel
Image: Alice Neel. James Hunter Black Draftee, 1965. Oil on canvas. COMMA Foundation, Belgium, © The Estate of Alice Neel

3) Unfinished—Thoughts Left Visible

March 18 through Sept. 4, 2016

The Metropolitan Museum of Art at The Met Breuer (new building)
945 Madison Ave., NY
212-731-1675

This exhibit confronts the all-time question of when an art piece is considered finished or not and explores the meaning of the word “unfinished.” This intriguing exhibit showcases both art that was unintentionally left undone by their creators and works that artists deliberately left unfinished. Works of art that are purposefully left unfinished are known as non finito—an aesthetic that appreciates and accepts the open-ended and unsettled, which many artists experimented with throughout history. The exhibit includes unfinished artwork from the Renaissance to the present-day.

Found in swamps around South America, the hoatzin is also commonly known as the “stinkbird.” Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons
Found in swamps around South America, the hoatzin is also commonly known as the “stinkbird.”
Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

4) Dinosaurs Among Us

March 21, 2016, through Jan. 2, 2017

American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West
79th St., NY
212-769-5100

Located in the LeFrak Family Gallery on the fourth floor, this exhibit explores the transformation from dinosaurs that once roamed the earth to the form of birds that are found to this day. The exhibition features similarities between the ancient dinosaur and birds. From fossil records and foundings, the line between dinosaurs and birds is now, essentially, nonexistent. Some highlights in the exhibit are: Dinosaur Nests, Eggs, and Babies; Dinosaur Feathers; Dinosaur Brains and Lungs; Dinosaur Bones, Beaks, and Claws; Dinosaur Feathers to Bird Flight; From the Age of Dinosaurs to the Age of Birds.

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