Changing The Way You Think About Permanent Cosmetics

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PermanentMakeup_AThe idea of having something done to skin permanently does not sound appealing, considering the typical individual wants to change their appearance on a regular basis. Sometimes, it is a necessity.

Permanent makeup is a cosmetic technique which permanently pigments the skin. The permanent makeup is done to forgo applying regular makeup on a daily basis, but it is also done for a variety of other reasons. In many cases, the technique is used to produce artificial eyebrows, fill in hairlines to show a fuller head of hair or to disguise scars.

Permanent cosmetic, also referred to dermapigmentation, micropigmentation and cosmetic tattooing, is helpful in cases where diseases such as alopeica totalis, cancer or old age occur. An individual has no eyebrows because of the disease or the cure and to improve self-esteem and presentation, permanent cosmetics are applied in order to create eyebrows. In the case of breast cancer reconstruction, patients undergo cosmetic tattooing for areola repigmentation after surgery.

Those who suffer from poor fine motor skills such as those suffering from arthritis, Parkinson’s disease or Muscular Dystrophy, who can not easily hold and apply makeup, are perfect candidates to have permanent makeup. Permanent cosmetics can also masks imperfections, camouflage scars or asymmetrical facial features.

Allergy sufferers also benefit from having permanent makeup. With itchy, watery eyes, makeup doesn’t come off if you rub your eyes with permanent eyeliner and eye make-up.

The art of permanent makeup began in the 20th century. Even though the tattoo is permanent, the work can fade over time and might need to be redone. Exposure to the sun or other environmental factors fades color and the amount and color of pigment deposit on the skin can affect the length of time that permanent makeup looks its best.

The colorant additives that are used in the cosmetic tattooing industry are regulated under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. However, the industry is not rigorously monitored. The State of New York does not license permanent cosmeticians but a permit is required from the New York State Department of Health. The permit requires that the establishment use only single use needles and approved ink handling methods in all permanent cosmetic procedures.

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Elizabeth Johnson is editor of Manhasset Press and Manhasset Press Magazine. Growing up in nearby Garden City and attending New York University, she is well-versed in the locale and knowledgeable about the beat she covers. Her community involvement is extensive and includes the Manhasset SCA, Kiwanis International, Manhasset Chamber of Commerce, St. Mary’s Church, and various civic and local charitable organizations. Curious by nature, her travels, community service, love of the arts as well as local sports give her the inside view to unique content. During her time at Anton, she has received several awards from the New York Press Association and the Press Club of LI, including the coveted "Best Community Newspaper" several years in a row.

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